Training

Overview

The Harbor House bicycle tour will travel approximately 320 miles over 5 days through various states. Although the intent is to develop a route with an average day's travel of 80 miles or so, there may be days that exceed that objective. Though the terrain for the most part is flat, there are some rolling sections. The following training program helps prepare cyclists successfully for the completion of the ride.

Getting Started

The key to getting started is not to get discouraged. Riding a bicycle long distances is only part physical; psychology plays an important part, especially in knowing what to expect. We gain that knowledge by practice. Remember, this is not a race! DO NOT try to ride with someone above your ability. Take your training and the ride at your own pace. Groups will form naturally on the training rides and on the actual ride.

Training

Here is a recommended training schedule that will adequately prepare you for what’s to come:

  • APRIL - 30 to 50 Miles per week (weekends)
  • MAY - 50 to 75 Miles per week (40 to 50 on weekends, 15 to 25 Miles spread over 2 days/nights during the week)
  • JUNE - 70 to 90 Miles per week (60 on weekends, 15 - 25 Miles, spread over 2 nights during the week)
  • Late JUNE - 100- 125 Miles per week (80 on weekends, 15- 25 Miles spread over 2 nights during the week)
  • JULY - Take it easy. Ride light.

The above is a recommendation; but, for most of us very unrealistic taking into account all the other commitments that fill our lives. It is somethingto shoot for. Please note, it is mandatory for new riders to participate in at least one long training ride.


Obviously, the more you ride, the more comfortable you feel.

NEVER RIDE WITHOUT A HELMET!!!

Helmets are required.

Clothing & Accessories

  • A proper fitting, top-quality helmet.
  • Bicycle shorts. They will prevent your legs from chaffing and your tush from saddle sores.
  • Sunglasses will protect your eyes from the sun, bugs, dust and small flying objects.
  • A good quality cycling jersey or moisture wicking shirt will keep you cool, and supply you with extra storage (back pockets).
  • Shoes designed for cycling. These shoes feature soles that do not flex, keeping your foot in one position. Wearing ordinary sneakers may cause a lot of pain in your feet and calves after a long day in the saddle.
  • Gloves designed for cycling will keep your hands from becoming numb, chaffed, and will provide protection in the event of a fall.
  • Pack a nylon jacket on the ride. It can still be chilly in the morning and you can shed it when it warms up.

Equipment

Helmets are required.

Any bicycle in good working order is adequate to finish this ride. A road or hybrid bicycle will provide the most comfort in the long haul because of their narrow, high-pressure tires and relative lightweight. A mountain bicycle will work; however, replacing the off-road tires with a narrower, smooth tread tire will make a dramatic difference in the way it feels on the road.

  • At least 1 spare tube.
  • Patch Kit
  • Tire Levers
  • Inflation Device (Pump or C02)
  • Calling Card or Cell Phone
  • Money, not a lot.
  • Two, 27oz full Water Bottles.
  • Munchies, Powerbar, Gu, Clif Bar, etc.

The less you carry with you while riding the more comfortable you will be.

Riding

As mentioned, riding long distances is only part physical. Your body is much like a car. If you do not fuel up, you WILL run out of gas. Do not use this ride to lose weight. Do not skip meals or reduce your intake. You will only be hurting your ability to become stronger on the road. You should however, eat sensibly.

We have paid particular attention to SAG stop locations on the route. All are 20-30 miles apart. This will allow you to carry as little as possible with you on the bike and to replenish every couple of hours.
While riding, please do the following:

  • Drink at least one-27 Oz water bottle per hour. Keeping yourself hydrated is going to be the challenge on the ride. It will be hot. Drink as much as possible, even after the ride.
  • Eat, Eat, Eat! You must eat while you ride, either at the sag stops, or out of your pocket. Experiment with what works best for you; you want something that will not sit in your stomach too long.
  • Wear Sunscreen.
  • Ride single file, riding as close to the side of the road as is possible.
  • Obey all traffic signals.

Most of all, HAVE FUN!!!

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